Snow Day! Aurora Snow Talks About Porn, Kink, and Life

A few weeks back, Aurora Snow wrote a piece for the Daily Beast article, in which she discussed her career in porn and what her life as a performer has been like. It was great to see another porn insider talk about both the great things and the not-so-great things about the industry and her candid views make for a fascinating read.

When I finished it, I was curious to know a little more about her time in the industry and where she sees things going. Here’s what she had to say.

1) Your Daily Beast article includes some pretty candid statements about your experiences in porn. What was it like for you to “come out” as older than most other performers? Did you expect that to have any impact on your career?

I don’t see it as “coming out” so much as making a point. I think it illustrates a shift in entertainment, with an emphasis being more on the reality of a situation than whatever fantasy could be created or pulled off. No, I do not expect the article to have a significant impact on my career. If anything it sheds a broader light on who I am as a person aside from the girl on film.

2) What do you think of the focus on young women in porn? How does that affect the ways that movies are made, marketed or bought? What was it like to be a young woman, trying to negotiate with other industry players?

The focus on young women isn’t only in porn. It seems to be a running theme in all things labeled entertainment. Women in entertainment don’t age, they get replaced or have cosmetic surgery to stay competitive. Men, however, age and simply transform into different, let’s say “sophisticated” roles. I can name over a dozen successful older men in porn and more than that in the entertainment business as a whole.

Looking at successful older women on the other hand, well, the numbers are greatly diminished. However, with the fast growing interest in MILF’s the older women are beginning to take on a sexy vibe completely unrelated to physical youth and carved more from their demeanor.

3) As your career evolves, are you finding that your fans are sticking with you? Or are your new fans replacing your old ones?

Both. My fans are wonderful and loyal people who generously support me in every aspect of my career from my adult films, to my comic book endeavors with Carnal Comics and my new line of skateboards with PornStar SkateBoards.

Over the years I have definitely acquired new fans as I have moved into shooting different niches. I enjoy doing whatever I choose to do and fans pick up on that.

4) If you could go back in time to when you were just starting out in porn and give yourself one piece of advice, what would it be?

Oddly enough, I have been very fortunate in my choices, but perhaps I would have given myself better advice for how to handle relationships given the intimate nature of the business.

5) You mentioned that you’re exploring new genres, especially “the world of bondage, submission, and domination, for starters”. How much of that grew out of your shifting role in the industry vs. your personal life? And how much does that influence your non-porn sex life?

I realize that I may only have a few years left in porn and I wanted to be sure that I’ve explored every aspect of my sexuality before leaving it all behind for my next adventure in life. I had never tried BDSM and wanted to test the waters before I left the business. I wanted to see what I thought about it. If it was something I enjoyed I wanted to have the opportunity to explore it freely with experienced professionals.

I am still sorting it all out and seeing what I do and don’t like. I feel I’ve done just about everything except the BDSM. When I make my exit and move on, I wanted to be happy with what I have done, experienced and discovered, but I also want to feel like I got it all out of my system before turning into a grown-up and trying out another career.

6) You’ve said that being a porn performer helped you shift from being a shy, conservative girl into a free spirit. What did porn teach you that you might not have learned otherwise? How did it help you expand and grow? Were there specific people who mentored you or supported you through that?

I was a book smart shy girl when I entered the big bad world of adult (just kidding). Being in the world of porn, I had to learn how to deal with people, how to stay firm on the things I did or did not want to do, and be comfortable with the decisions I made. I learned a level of both physical and mental comfort, a comfort I had previously not had. I’ve always felt awkward in my own skin.

For example, the one thing about my body I disliked the most were my legs, my calves in particular. I have rather muscular legs and was always embarrassed by them, I was never comfortable wearing shorts or short skirts and was envious of the girls with the twig legs who could. I can thank many people in porn as well as my fans for boosting my confidence and I now happily flaunt my legs, which some say are my best feature (besides my smile, that is… Or certain well, skills…).

7) There has been a new group of anti-porn feminists, including Gail Dines, Donna Hughes and Shelley Lubben. Have you been tracking what they’ve been saying? If so, what do you think about their claims about porn and its impact on performers?

Porn isn’t right for everyone. Like most industries, it is what you make of it. All aspects of entertainment, including Hollywood have a dark underbelly. It’s unfair for crusaders to single porn out and say it’s all bad.

There are many smart woman out there who have used porn as a stepping stone and go on to something else. It’s about making choices in life, and taking responsibility for the choices we make as individuals. Getting into porn shouldn’t be a goal in life. Using it to explore one’s sexuality, or using it to achieve another goal are keys to making the business work for you without you working for it. Keeping hobbies and friends outside of the business, as well as having a mission in life are what have kept me grounded all these years.

I appreciate being in the adult business more now than I ever did. My brother was in a near fatal motorcycle accident last year, I dropped my life to help him for an entire year. I couldn’t have done that if it weren’t for the freedoms I am granted in my career.

Dr. Charlie Glickman

Charlie Glickman is the Education Program Manager at Good Vibrations. He also writes, blogs, teaches workshops and university courses, presents at conferences, and trains sexuality educators. He’s certified by the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists, and loves geeking out about sex, relationships, sex-positivity, love and shame, communities of erotic affiliation, and sexual practices and techniques of all varieties. Follow him online, on Twitter at @charlieglickman, or on Facebook.

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